Art and Reform: Sara Galner, the Saturday Evening Girls, and the Paul Revere Pottery


October 25, 2007–February 10, 2008
Decorative Arts Gallery

The Paul Revere Pottery (1908–1942) was established in Boston to provide a safe environment in which members of the Saturday Evening Girls Club could work to help contribute wages to their immigrant households. This exhibition features over one hundred works from the early years of the pottery, whose wares were adorned with playful designs of native flowers, barnyard animals, and rural landscapes. Most of the works in the exhibition were decorated by Sara Galner, whose Eastern European parents lived in Boston's North End. The exhibition follows Sara's life and career, offering a unique, personalized view into this turn-of-the-century pottery, the Arts and Crafts movement, and immigrant life in America.

Sara Galner
 
Sara Galner
 
Sara Galner
 

Images:


Sara Galner (American, born Austria-Hungary, 1894–1982), Bowl, 1916. Earthenware with glaze. 2 ¾ x 8 ½ in. Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Promised gift of Dr. David L. Bloom and family in honor of his mother, Sara Galner Bloom.

Sara Galner (American, born Austria-Hungary, 1894–1982), Beaker and Lid, 1914. Earthenware with glaze. 4 3/8 x 3 ½ in. Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Gift of Dr. David L. Bloom and family in honor of his mother, Sara Galner Bloom.

Sara Galner (American, born Austria-Hungary, 1894–1982), Untitled, 1917. Earthenware with glaze. 6 ¼ x 4 ¼ x ¼ in. Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Gift of Dr. David L. Bloom and family in honor of his mother, Sara Galner Bloom.